West Campus: One Place, Two Worlds

David, 61, sits outside taking a cigarette break. He has been working this part of Guadalupe Street for a week.
David, 61, sits outside taking a cigarette break. He has been working this part of Guadalupe Street for a week.

If there’s one thing Austin certainly doesn’t lack in, it is diversity. Whether it be the food, the sights, or in this case, the people, uniqueness is evident.  The city’s motto is “Keep Austin Weird” for a reason.

 

Austinites celebrate each other’s differences because after all the admiration that comes from learning about the interesting experiences that make up a person, in the end, they realize we are all the same, we are all human.

 

However, there are a group of people with a multitude of differences yet not only are they not cherished, but they’re not even acknowledged half the time.

 

David takes in the sunlight in between smoking. He’s bundled up yet says he enjoys the way the warmth of the sun feels on his face.
David takes in the sunlight in between smoking. He’s bundled up yet says he enjoys the way the warmth of the sun feels on his face.

David, 61, sits solemnly outside Guadalupe Street’s busy Urban Outfitters wearing a week’s worth of dirt, blending into the corner façade with a lit cigarette dangling between his middle and pointer finger.

 

Smirking, he only provides his first name, because he hopes one day to become a famous literary figure, “like Voltaire or Prince,” said David.

 

He was born in Austin, lived here his whole life, and even attended the University of Texas at Austin many years ago.

 

“ I love UT, you know I was a studio art major actually, on scholarship, … I was taking a full load here at the university, I had a prestigious job at the Westwood Country club, ya know taking water bottles to the tennis players and when I met Susan I dropped out. I just dropped out,” said David.

 

Junior year David met a girl named Susan and fell in love. He withdrew from his classes, and never looked back.

 

One day Susan disappeared and in a state of disarray he said he found comfort in drugs, specifically cocaine. For years now he has tried to hold on to a series of telemarketing jobs to stay afloat, yet has found himself out of a job time and time again due to companies’ financial troubles. Between loosing his first love and various lost job opportunities it was hard to get clean, said David. He continued to use up to the day his parents died fifteen years ago.

 

Leaning against the outside of Urban Outiftter’s , he looks directly into the camera lens.
Leaning against the outside of Urban Outiftter’s , he looks directly into the camera lens.  As students walk by, they seem intrigued in David, thus he proceeds to chuckle softly.

“They disinherited me, my folks…they knew they couldn’t help me, leaving me money would just enable my addiction. It was a good decision looking back, even I know it wouldn’t have done me good,” said David.

 

Suddenly, he begins to stand up and stretch. When he takes off his crooked, black sunglasses David’s blue eyes may be packed into folds of wrinkles showcasing not only his old age but a lifetime of drug use. However, there’s a spark of life behind it all. He has been clean for two years now.

 

“ I just couldn’t handle it anymore. The crack had me livin’ in a nightmare. I went to rehab on 25th and Trinity called Road to Recovery, I got housing there for three months and after a while got better. I smoke, cigarettes that is, cause it helps me take my mind of the crack, the nightmare,” said David.

 

David is recounting some of his life experiences in between taking sips of the coffee a stranger gave to him.
David is recounting some of his life experiences in between taking sips of the coffee a stranger gave to him. He looks off into the distance most of the time, recalling memories to discuss.

He said he hopes to one day go back to school here at UT in order to finish his last year of classes and get a degree. He knows his age is a factor that works against him, yet sits across the street from campus in order to feel close to the days he was just another student.

 

“ I know I’m old, can’t work well with these computers students use now, but maybe I’ll write a book, something to get their attention,” David said. “Publish or parish a professor once told me, maybe I can publish instead.”

 

All this time he has been sitting here, on a rare, cold Austin day, allowing me a look into his life, and not once has he gotten offended by or closed off a topic. David said he enjoys talking about what he’s been through to someone.

 

“I think we would all do it different, if we had 20 years, and know what we know now, yeah I definitely would.”

 

He stands up, takes off his hat to stretch and begins to people watch.  He never asks for money, yet simply stands there watching people go on with their day. It’s not a trick, yet works quite well as people start to hand him coins and leftover food.
He stands up, takes off his hat to stretch and begins to people watch. He never asks for money, yet simply stands there watching people go on with their day. It’s not a trick, yet works quite well as people start to hand him coins and leftover food.

 

 

Paul, 57, folds up his pizza to eat. He not only looks like David, 61, but has been become friends with him due to the location of Guadalupe Street he chooses to sit on has recently been David’s spot of choice.
Paul, 57, folds up his pizza to eat. He not only looks like David, 61, but has been become friends with him due to the location of Guadalupe Street he chooses to sit on has recently been David’s spot of choice.
Russ, 43, shows his friends how bad his lack of dental hygiene has gotten.  He hasn’t been able to brush his teeth in weeks due to using majority of his money on other items such as food and clothing.
Russ, 43, shows his friends how bad his lack of dental hygiene has gotten. He hasn’t been able to brush his teeth in weeks due to using majority of his money on other items such as food and clothing.
Mike, 25, and Jamie, 25, invite their friend Russ, 43, to eat with them. The three of them call themselves “family,” they aren’t blood related but have lived together on and off for around five years.
Mike, 25, and Jamie, 25, invite their friend Russ, 43, to eat with them. The three of them call themselves “family,” they aren’t blood related but have lived together on and off for around five years.
Mike and Jamie watch the pigeons feed on their leftover breakfast. They say how they feel satisfaction when giving the birds a meal.
Mike and Jamie watch the pigeons feed on their leftover breakfast. They say how they feel satisfaction when giving the birds a meal.
Mike and Jamie, both 25, enjoy the lunch they received from a stranger. They talked about the kindness of the Austin people, and their willingness to give. Most of the money they receive is used on the beer hidden in the brown bags beside them.
Mike and Jamie, both 25, enjoy the lunch they received from a stranger. They talked about the kindness of the Austin people, and their willingness to give. Most of the money they receive is used on the beer hidden in the brown bags beside them.
Advertisements

“Sickness Causes Troubles in Academics”

 Austin, Texas— With a new school year comes an influx of people- as well as the germs they carry with them- this has resulted in an increase of University of Texas students falling behind in their classes.

 Many come to the University of Texas at Austin in order to begin their pursuit of a degree, little do they know that the first semester can be a challenging one, with a high risk for health problems that may lead to difficulties with keeping up with classwork.

 “Almost 15% surveyed last fall had negative academic impact as a result of upper respiratory infections,” said University Health Services’ outreach coordinator and consumer educator, Sherry Bell, “Students reported lower grades, significant interruptions in completion of coursework, and even got to the point where they needed to drop a class altogether.”

 Jessica Slate, a freshman at The University of Texas at Austin, already finds it difficult to stay on track while fighting flu-like symptoms.

 “ I find a lot more excuses to lay in bed, watch TV, play on my computer, stuff like that, instead of writing essays or doing work that’s due because I feel so lousy.”

 It’s not unusual that one would choose to enjoy leisure activities over completing assignments, but when faced with being sick, it is that much harder to stay motivated. This attitude is not only seen with new students but is also found with upperclassmen.

 

As the years go by this problem doesn’t abide by the adage “ older and wiser” but simply continues as a pressing issue no matter how many sick days a student racks up.

 

“Personally, I didn’t care to concentrate on taking notes when I had my nose to worry about,” says Julie Berger, a Junior at The University of Texas at Austin, “I didn’t want to do it but last week I left my 2 hour class 3 times to take care of my runny nose and sore throat. It’s annoying because I feel like I miss so much but it’s like I don’t have a choice, I notice I’m bothering people.”

As a notably large college campus of 40,000+ students from not only around the country, but the world, it’s very easy for illnesses to be spread fast.

 

“When one area is exposed to different strains of viruses, put in tight, highly crowded, spaces, even if a student carries a slightly different strain, not everyone has the immunity, and when exposed will get infected”, says Bell.

 

However, with every problem there’s always a solution. The University Health Services (UHS) here at UT frequently convey their message of how to prevent getting sick, and when students do be become ill, the variety of services available to them to get healthy again.  

 Not all students see their sickness serious enough to pay the UHS a visit to get the help they need.

 “Different people go at different comfort levels,” says Bell.

 According to the University Health Services’ Top 40 Diagnosis for the Start of Fall 2013, the largest diagnosis of 318 upper respiratory infections are according to Bell, “that who actually chose to go see doctors and seek medical assistance.”

 With all the people who state that poor health conditions play a great role in falling behind in their studies, there are many who decide to take it upon themselves and attempt at self-care. 

 “For every person that comes in with, let’s say, a runny nose, there may be thirty more that opt not to make an appointment,” Bell says, “ It seems logical to go see a doctor when you’re sick, but a great number of people simply don’t.”

 In order to stay healthy and stay on track with one’s academics UHS faculty urges students to take advantage of the services provided. However, for various reasons since many do not, the UHS makes it a point to inform students about easy steps they can take to prevent getting infected on their own.

 Bell talks to students about how less than 10 tips can help one stay healthy. The most useful are also the simple ones in the fight against disease during this time, especially flu season such as washing hands, coughing into your elbow or tissue, getting a good night’s sleep, and staying hydrated.

 “If all else fails, these are easy steps to avoid falling subject to infection,” says Bell. 

 Whether students have a runny nose or a full on flu, between the wide array of services at their disposable and the statistics regarding the impact being sick has on academics, Bell says that all students have the information they need to assist them as they gear up for the school year.

 

Dainty Hooligan: Style for the Multi-Dimensional Trendsetter

Dainty Hooligan, one of The Drag’s newest boutiques, sells affordable style with a West Coast aesthetic.
Dainty Hooligan, one of The Drag’s newest boutiques, sells affordable style with a West Coast aesthetic.

http://utorange.wordpress.com/2013/10/11/dainty-hooligan-style-for-the-multi-dimensional-trendsetter/

Text by Stephanie Rothman
Photos by Becca Chavoya

Open since June, the Austin location of Dainty Hooligan is the fourth store to open in the country, with the parent store in Tulsa and the warehouse in California. Owner and buyer Jessica Issler gathers inspiration from West Coast fashion and markets towards the girly, yet edgy girl, says store manager Whitney Fischer. “The clothes fit the independent girl, one that has that willingness to stick out — a girl who’s feminine yet spunky, that ying-yang kind of thing,” Fischer says.

Walking in, visitors see a seemingly endless selection of hanging racks packed with vivid, graphic dresses, tops, skirts and pants in a variety of cuts and patterns. Color coordinated racks model Chevron sundresses, maxi skirts, graphic sweaters and printed pants. The boutique offers brands, such as Sky Clothing, Lush, Hardtail, Frankie B, Wildfox Couture and Olivaceous. The prices of most pieces range from $20 to $40.

In contrast to the apparel’s colorful palette, the ceiling exposes industrial infrastructure slathered in black paint between sparkling chandeliers. The two elements complement one another, bringing a chic, downtown loft feel to the room.

As all Longhorn women know, finding trendy, burnt orange apparel is no easy feat. Dainty Hooligan has a great selection of game-day attire, perfect for cheering on the Horns. The boutique’s accessory selection includes beaded statement necklaces, chunky gold rings and suede lace-up wedges, which can take any outfit from day to night. Fitting in with the collegiate fashion scene, Dainty Hooligan has the potential to become a new staple among Austin 20-somethings.